Volleyball: Where Did the Name Come From?

The name of the original game was Mintonette and was created at a YMCA in Massachusetts. An observer started the name of “volley ball”. It was created as a response to basketball, which was still in its infancy. Volleyball was meant to be a less rough/rigorous indoor sport.

Of its origins:

On February 9, 1895, in Holyoke, Massachusetts (USA), William G. Morgan, a YMCA physical education director, created a new game called Mintonette as a pastime to be played (preferably) indoors and by any number of players. The game took some of its characteristics from tennis and handball. Another indoor sport, basketball, was catching on in the area, having been invented just ten miles (sixteen kilometers) away in the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, only four years before. Mintonette was designed to be an indoor sport, less rough than basketball, for older members of the YMCA, while still requiring a bit of athletic effort.

After an observer, Alfred Halstead, noticed the volleying nature of the game at its first exhibition match in 1896, played at the International YMCA Training School (now called Springfield College), the game quickly became known as volleyball (it was originally spelled as two words: “volley ball”). Volleyball rules were slightly modified by the International YMCA Training School and the game spread around the country to various YMCAs.

The title is misleading. It is actually showing a different, Asian sport called “kick volleyball”. I found their commitment inspiring (smile).

 

Volleyball

Kick volleyball (Sepak takraw)

 

 

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